Partners in Change

Through Partners in Change (PiC), we are interested in working alongside the organisations we support to better understand the factors that can help to enable or hinder change around services and supports for people experiencing poverty and/or trauma.

 

Launched in May 2021, PiC awarded £2.4 million to six projects across Scotland which offered aspirational change plans. While the ultimate aim of the work is to reduce the impact that poverty and/or trauma has on people's lives, we will be using and sharing learning throughout PiC to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of change, how they vary across systems and the role of a funder in supporting change projects.

We will also be identifying and sharing emerging practice and themes around how to use a change model to improve outcomes for people experiencing poverty and/or trauma.

The six projects awarded funding were:

Awards

  • The University of Strathclyde - Awarded £445,055 for their change project which is focused on identifying actions that make paid employment sustainable protection against poverty. This partnership between the University’s Fraser of Allander Institute, Institute for Inspiring Children's Futures and the Poverty Alliance will work with employers and related public services, as well as people in poverty, to identify and implement meaningful change that will reduce the risk of in-work poverty.
  • Scottish Refugee Council – Awarded £450,000 to pilot a case management model with newly arrived and dispersed families, supporting them with immigration advice and representation to increase access to justice and reduce poverty for 200 families in Scotland. The project will partner with Latta & Co and JustRight Scotland.
  • Aberlour Child Care Trust – Awarded £409,153 for their Tayside Family Financial Wellbeing Project, which aims to facilitate the systems-change needed to promote new and different approaches to financially assisting vulnerable families. This project will be delivered in partnership with local families and Tayside Councils.
  • Capital City Partnership – Awarded £300,000 for the adaptation of “Maximise” which takes a child-centred, family minded approach to tackling child poverty in Edinburgh. Working together with partners including Children 1st and Community Help and Advice Initiative, the approach will be adapted and extended to better meet the needs of Black and Ethnic Minority Communities.  
  • Action for Children – Awarded £450,000 for the delivery of the STAY Programme, which seeks to improve college retention, completion and success rates amongst care-experienced young people.  Action for Children will work with Glasgow College, West College Scotland, Edinburgh College and other partners to provide broader support for students, outwith the college setting, to deal with complex issues such as poverty, mental health, homelessness, drug and alcohol misuse, money management, financial abuse or unemployment.
  • Apex Scotland – Awarded £337,731 to develop and test a trauma-informed environment both for the users of Apex’s services, primarily people facing severe and multiple disadvantages, and the staff that deliver them. Apex Scotland will partner with Resilience Learning Partnership and a Psychotherapist trained in Traumatic Stress Studies to develop and embed this work. The project will be tracked by an embedded researcher who will produce a final evaluation overseen by University of Dundee.

Project contact

Project contact